MAGIC LANGUAGE!

DownloadedFileThe ambiguity of words fascinates me. The English language is full of anomalies: there or their, of or off, sheep or shipe (plural)? When you are a writer you are constantly faced with different ways of describing a situation or place. I know that some writing geniuses have pondered for days over one sentence or a paragraph.

The fast pace of our lives today and the access we have to texting and email means that people have less patience and, I believe, overlook the beauty of our expanding language preferring to use short-cuts to communicate.

Language evolves over time, never more so than now. Our wonderful multi-national society means that words from other languages will become assimilated into the English language, as they have always been but now, faster. Reading a text made up of one letter sentences: U(instead of you) R(instead or are) L8(instead of Late) might be okay for some, but this way of communicating drives me a bit crazy.

Okay, call me an old fuddy-duddy, tell me I’ve missed the language boat, say I am old-fashioned; I assure you I’m not. I just want others to relish words the way I do and I’m no genius, in fact I’m a novice when it comes to writing novels. In my work as a director and playwright, I wrote to deadlines, focusing on one particular subject that I would research in-depth. Within that structured set-up, I had artistic freedom because I worked with actors who bought their own interpretation to my words. When you are writing novels, there is no such input when you begin. You are standing in a desert, watching the sand shifting in the breeze, hoping you might have a revelation, a Damascene moment when your plot will flower like a desert rose and an oasis will appear on the arid skyline where the words start to flow like water under the palm trees. Oops, that’s a bit flowery…!

Word derivation – where words came from, how they changed over time and developed into the speech and the written word we are familiar with today never ceases to amaze me. The roots of all languages show how people used words as sounds to connect with each other, moving from grunts in a Neolithic landscape to grammatical language, supporting a structured civilised society. If you look at ancient documents, the language is hard to decipher unless you have studied ancient history, but the beauty of the writing, the construction of the sentences, the way the documents are illustrated force you to consider the time and effort spent in an age where only a pen and ink was available.DownloadedFile-1

I’m afraid a text simply doesn’t do it for me.

 

 

NEW BOOK – RURAL CUT BY LYN FERRAND

Very excited about my new book!

THE BLOG RESTAURANT

eb4894c7-be42-42aa-9f1b-7cf9ab474844My second novel is now available at www.feedaread.com and on KINDLE!

Filmmaker Steve Firenze responds to a plea for help from Harry, his daughter’s godfather, who has relocated from London to a small town in the West Country. Caught up in Harry’s desperate claim that an unscrupulous property developer is financially exploiting him, Steve inadvertently exposes the dark side of the rural idyll and comes face to face with corruption and murder. While attempting to solve Harry’s issues, Steve befriends Eloise and becomes involved in a series of malevolent events that threaten her sanity. They are forced to reassess their values, the way they perceive the changing countryside and the people who live there. Black humour is ever present in this tale of unfulfilled expectations surrounding the myth of rural life. With a tongue-in-cheek look at the criminal activities of a local politician, his associates and a quartet of elderly…

View original post 145 more words

SPELL AND BE DAMNED!

Looking back over my past blogs, I need a stiff drink. The temperature outside is 30c, my study is hot and I am sweating but it has nothing to do with the summer. It’s the fact that I have found spelling mistakes in the first few chapters of the new book I’m writing. HELP!

Just found another spelling kistake!
Just found another spelling kistake!

When I was at school, I remember one long-suffering English teacher telling my mother that my brain worked too fast and I should slow down and consider each word, each sentence, each paragraph methodically before submitting an essay. The content was worthy and imaginative but my work needed editing – and how.  It’s an inherent condition that haunts me as an adult writer, damn it!

I love the process of writing, but tend to be a ‘rusher’. Spilling out all those inner thoughts and ideas on to the page is thrilling. But when I am half-way through a book and caught up in the lives of my characters, I run hell-for-leather with them, chasing after their complicated lives; the way they act, think and speak and then, through all the mayhem, I forget to double-check spelling and punctuation.

The case of the lost adverb needs solving. The over-used adjective is a nuisance and should be jailed. The missed quotation marks must be fined and put squarely in their place, among the dialogue. These rogues pepper my dreams when I am writing a book. Do other authors suffer in the same way, I ask myself?

What is wrong with my brain? I know how to spell. I know how to punctuate. I consider myself moderately good at grammar – the English language is my native tongue! Something happens to all these attributes when I write. The story gallops forward, refusing to stop while I insert a full-stop or comma. It has a life of its own and I am powerless to slow it down.

Still, I have read Ulysses by James Joyce – perhaps I shouldn’t beat myself up so hard. Perception is in the eye of the beholder – or something? Writing for me is an on-going learning process that will never stop and that’s the real joy of it. I have this bottomless pit in my head full to the brim with words. All I have to do is sort them out and arrange them in some sort of readable order. Easy. Can you spot the deliberate mistake?

Blimey! My desk looks tidy this morning...
Blimey! My desk looks tidy this morning.

IT’S OKAY TO SING SHOW TUNES!

Lyn Ferrand
This is me, singing in my youth!

So, this morning, I’m listening to a CD called Bernstein on Broadway, singing at the top of my voice as I clear away the breakfast dishes. I’m at the age where it’s okay to listen to show tunes and sing-along. It got me thinking; how many other things in life I didn’t do, because at the time they were not part of the image I was trying to portray to the world. What a shame.

The list is a long one. I wanted to get to know my family better, but it seemed intrusive to ask too many questions when I was younger; I didn’t want them to think I was interfering. I never complained; I didn’t want to upset anybody. I was acquiescent and agreed with everyone; because I wanted people to like me.  I didn’t try sky-diving, or water-skiing, or motor-racing, or mountain climbing because I was scared to death of death.

On the positive side, I did write and produce plays, direct in the theatre, act and sing professionally, have babies (4)! marry (twice)! and recently, write and publish two novels, so not too bad.  The desire to stretch myself and achieve is still there, though these days, it’s tempered with an acute awareness of time – how fast it goes and how to elongate it on a daily basis. How? Do things SLOWLY! A lot of my life has been spent rushing around chasing my tail and calling it ‘being too busy to do what I really want to.’ Now I understand that I control how I use time, not the other way round.

It’s so easy to overlook the important things in life without knowing you are doing it. And how do you define the important things? I guess by stopping, slowing down, listening to your deepest feelings and hearing your heart’s voice. The constant aggressive intrusion of mobile phones, tablets, iPods, laptops etc chain you like a prisoner in leg-irons to a sense of guilt that makes you believe that you might miss ‘something’ really important if you are not available 24/7. Yes, you will miss something; talking face to face with the people you love and who love you, listening to them while they sit next to you, in person and taking time to be available FOR THEM.

This is not throwing the proverbial baby out with the washing-up water. I love technology. I love the way it keep my brain active working out how to understand all those bloody error messages that invade my screen, how my life is bombarded with nice lads and lasses wanting me to sign up to ‘better’ mobile phone contracts, dealing with phishing and mad emails from desperate folk needing money and begging me to invest in bogus money-making schemes. I love all that; it makes me laugh. When I was young, I would certainly have suffered doubt and indecision about such cyber attacks. Now, I couldn’t give a toss, because I give myself time to consider. I never make up my mind about anything unless I have at least seven days to ponder. That drives the ‘rush-about’ crowd crazy. They want instant. I’m now a paid up member of the slow club.

The CD of show tunes is coming to an end. Time to press play again and sing-along for another hour or so and I prepare to write another chapter of my new novel. Life is slow and sweet these days!

Here’s a good starting point – http://www.slowfood.com/

 

 

 

 

 

 

NEW BOOK – RURAL CUT BY LYN FERRAND

eb4894c7-be42-42aa-9f1b-7cf9ab474844My second novel is now available at www.feedaread.com and on KINDLE!

Filmmaker Steve Firenze responds to a plea for help from Harry, his daughter’s godfather, who has relocated from London to a small town in the West Country. Caught up in Harry’s desperate claim that an unscrupulous property developer is financially exploiting him, Steve inadvertently exposes the dark side of the rural idyll and comes face to face with corruption and murder. While attempting to solve Harry’s issues, Steve befriends Eloise and becomes involved in a series of malevolent events that threaten her sanity. They are forced to reassess their values, the way they perceive the changing countryside and the people who live there. Black humour is ever present in this tale of unfulfilled expectations surrounding the myth of rural life. With a tongue-in-cheek look at the criminal activities of a local politician, his associates and a quartet of elderly incomers who have purchased houses on a gated community for the retired, Rural Cut explores how financial greed and the repercussions of indiscriminate development can ruin lives and change rural places for ever. This is Lyn Ferrand’s second novel.
Publisher: FeedARead.com
ISBN: 1784077208
EAN: 9781784077204
Dimensions: 20.0 x 12.0 x 2.0 centimeters (0.54 kg)
Age Range: 15+ years

You can buy your KINDLE download at Amazon.co.uk:

RURAL CUT [Kindle Edition]
Lyn Ferrand (Author)
Kindle Price: £1.81 includes VAT* & free wireless delivery via Amazon Whispernet51939LIUiTL._BO2,204,203,200_PIsitb-sticker-v3-big,TopRight,0,-55_SX278_SY278_PIkin4,BottomRight,1,22_AA300_SH20_OU02_

Lyn Ferrand
Lyn Ferrand

Hope you enjoy all the twists and turns in this story of rural expectations, murder and corruption. In the light of today’s news about slavery in the UK, my book is on the pulse!

Enjoy – and please review the book when you have read it and make this struggling new author very happy!

Lyn Ferrand June 2014